Tuesday, March 21, 2006

'Blue Walleye' Makes News

Our work was recently cited in a March 19, 2006 article in the St. Paul Pionner Press. Read the Article Here


12 comments:

Ron Calvert said...

Hi, just heard your interview with Gord Ellis on CBC radio here in Thunder Bay, Ont. For a period we lived in the Ottawa Valley and I used to catch a silvery blue (as opposed to the deep blue colour) walleye bellow the hydor dam at Rolphtom about 100 miles up river from Ottawa. For what its worth, my 7th birthday dinner in 1949 was a pile of Blue Pickerel. For eating, Blues were preferred to the Yellows. We lived on the Grand River near the north shore of Lake Erie in the town of Dunnville, Ont where the river was damed. You probably know this but here it is anyway. I spent lots of time around the river as a kid watching people with dip nets in the spring; a Blue was never caught, lots of Yellows though. Blues were commercially fished out of Port Maitland and Dunnville. The gerneral talk was that Lake Erie Blues lived far from shore in deep water and were shoal spawners; always smaller than the Yellows. For a short period large Blues started to show up, then nothing. Everyone blamed the smelt.

Anonymous said...

Hi Ron: Thanks for the great sighting information on blue pike. I would like to speak with you on the phone about your observations of blue pike. Would you mind giving me your phone number or e-mail address. Do you know anyone who could help us find a commercial fishermen that actually handled blue pike from Lake Erie??? Wayne Schaefer

Derreck said...

Derreck - North Bay ON lake Nipissing We get 4 - 5 blues each year. Our MNR say they are not blues - I will send samples next time

It's good to know someone has noticed

Anonymous said...

Hi Wayne;

We were fishing lake Goodliff with a party of 4 from Sept 23rd to Sept 30th, 2006, where we caught possibly 50 to 60 blue walleyes, all in the 20" range.
None of us had ever heard of blue walleye and were a little puzzled catchingthese different looking fish.
There appeared to no difference to these walleyes other than the blueish haze on their bodies.
Hope this helps you in your research.

Anonymous said...

Hi Derreck. We would be most interested in getting a tissue sample (pectoral fin in alcolhol) from Lake Nipissing since it is in the Great Lakes drainage and may hold fish similar to the extinct blue pike of Lake Erie. Good fishing. Wayne Schaefer

Anonymous said...

Dear Anonymous: Thank you for sighting of blue walleye on Lake Goodliff. We will add it to our data base. Good fishing. Wayne Schaefer

Anonymous said...

JUST READ YOUR ARTICLE ON BLUE WALLEYE AND THOUGHT I WOULD LET YOU KNOW ABOUT WERNER LAKE ONT. WHICH IS NOT FAR FROM DAVIDSON LAKE MAN.IN NOPOMING PROVINCIAL PARK I ONLY ICEFISH THERE BUT EVERY FISH YOU CATCH IS A BLUE WALLEYE AVG.2LBS.

Anonymous said...

Dear Anonymous: Thank you for your sighting in Werner Lake. We will add it to our data base. We have very few lakes in Ontario where all the fish are blue. Good fishing. Wayne Schaefer

Anonymous said...

Just came across your site as I too am facinated with what I call Blue Walleye. On Grayson Lake,north east of Savant in Ontario, we caught numerous fish with a very indigo blue slime in June 2005. First time for catching such fish for me.Generally in the 14-18" size. Did not look like the walleye we catch elsewhere,darker on color,not as gold as usual.

ED DAVIS said...

CAUGHT NUMEROUS WALLEYE WITH INDIGO BLUE SLIME ON GRAYSON LAKE,N.E. OF SAVANT JUNE 2005. FISH WERE GENERALLY 14-18" LOOKED DIFFERENT FROM USUAL GOLDEN WALLEYES, BUT WERE DEFINATELY WALLEYES. FIRST AND ONLY TIME IN MANY YEARS OF FISHING IN MANY LAKES IN ONTARIO TO CATCH THESE BLUES.HOPE THIS IS OF SOME VALUE TO YOU.
ED DAVIS

Anonymous said...

I am just bit at a loss about the Blue Pike issue. I've been born and raised in Cleveland,Ohio. I remember very well that at a local pub/restaurant my dad would take us every Friday for Blue Pike dinners. This was during the 50's and possibly, if memory suits me well, as late as maybe 1960-61. I do remember that the fish was such a great tasting fillet that even to this day, if you've never had the "luxury" of eating them, that you would give your Perch and Yellow Walleye to your dog to eat, compared to the flavor of this fish. My grandfather, now going back into the 30's, used to tell me of the small wooden boat fleets off Edgewater Park (Cleveland Lakefront)and the men hanging lanterns over the sides and pulling in Blue Pike like tuna in a fishing frenzy. This passed of course with time and pollution and overfishing. Now, the question I have, for anyone, is the condition of events leading to the extinction of this great fish. What I had been told is that, partly, and possibly (?) a major factor was that the large insect otherwise known as the "Canadian Soldier" breed, almost exclusively, in the Detroit River, was one of the main staple diets of this fish. With major pollution problems this little fellow went the way of the dinosaurs, extinct. With the loss of a major food supply the Blue Pike, quickly followed. Is this, or any part of it, true. I would imagine it could be possible as it is with many species of fish and birds on the planet as with Leopard Seals with Penguins, Crocodiles with Wilde Beasts crossing the rivers, etc, etc. Where an annual life cycle/migration atracts predators to spawning/breeding prey. Somebody fill me in.

generic cialis said...

Hello, I do not agree with the previous commentator - not so simple